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Saudi Arabia Renews Commitment to Supercomputing

Feb 4, 2015 |

Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), located on the Red Sea 50 miles north of Jeddah, is gearing up for a new supercomputer twenty-five times more powerful than its current system. Shaheen-2, a successor to the original Shaheen, is part of an $80 million contract with supercomputer maker Cray that reaffirms Read more…

UK Selects Five Universities to Lead Alan Turing Institute

Feb 4, 2015 |

To bolster the UK’s position as a leader in the areas of big data and algorithm research, five universities have been chosen to lead the county’s new Alan Turing Institute, which will be based at the British Library in London’s Knowledge Quarter. The selectees that will head the Institute are Cambridge, Edinburgh, Oxford, Warwick and University Read more…

Scalable Priority Queue Minimizes Contention

Feb 2, 2015 |

The multicore era has been in full-swing for a decade now, yet exploiting all that parallel goodness remains a prominent challenge. Ideally, compute efficiency would scale linearly with increased cores, but that’s not always the case. As core counts are only set to proliferate across the computing spectrum, it’s an issue that merits serious attention. Researchers from Read more…

Student Teams Race to Set 1000 mph Land Speed Record

Jan 30, 2015 |

Increasingly, making cars go faster falls under the purview of high-performance computing. This is especially true in the case of supersonic cars, vehicles capable of traveling faster than the speed of sound. With its undeniable cool factor and a close relationship to advanced computing, supersonic racing is getting school-age children interested in science, engineering, math Read more…

ANSYS Simulations Weigh in on Deflategate

Jan 30, 2015 |

Even if you aren’t among the third of Americans who will sit down to watch the Super Bowl this Sunday, if you follow the news you are undoubtedly familiar with ‘Deflategate,’ the scandal surrounding under-inflated footballs that cast a dark cloud over the New England Patriots’ win over the Indianapolis Colts over a week ago. Read more…

Weekly Twitter Roundup

Jan 29, 2015 |

Here at HPCwire, we want to help keep the HPC community as up-to-date as possible on some of the most captivating news items that were tweeted throughout the week. The tweets that caught our eye this past week are listed below. Check back in next Thursday for an entirely updated list.   Seymour Cray-master architect of the #supercomputer Read more…

IBM Advances Self-Assembly in 3D Transistors

Jan 28, 2015 |

The key to Moore’s law is the ability to incorporate ever-smaller feature sizes into each new chip generation. While the exponential progress ensconced in the “law” has slowed down in the last decade, the payoff is still compelling enough that chip engineers will go to great lengths to forestall its long-predicted demise. One of these Read more…

NVIDIA K80 GPU-System Speeds Up Bioinformatics Tool 12X

Jan 28, 2015 |

Not long ago, the high cost and relative slowness of DNA sequencing were the rate-limiting bottlenecks in biomedical research. Today, post-sequencing data analysis is the biggest challenge. The reason, of course, is the prodigious output from modern next-generation sequencing (NGS) instruments (e.g., Illumina and ThermoFisher/Life Technologies) overwhelming analysis pipelines. Efficiently sifting the data treasure trove Read more…

A New Purpose for Old Smartphones: Cluster Computing

Jan 27, 2015 |

There are now more mobile devices than people in the world, and the average person upgrades their phone every 18 months. This raises the question of what happens to all the old models. Some of the materials used in these ubiquitous devices do get recycled, but all too often, the phones, tablets and other outdated Read more…

Greening the World’s Most Ubiquitous Building Material

Jan 23, 2015 |

Concrete is one of the oldest building materials with a history dating back to ancient Egypt. Today, concrete – comprised primarily of water, aggregate and cement – is the most widely used material in the world. Despite being a fairly low-impact material environmentally speaking, creating concrete still takes energy; thus the wide deployment of the Read more…