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Tag: astrophysics

Simulations Reveal More About Oldest Known Star

Jul 23, 2014 |

Thanks to the power of supercomputing, scientists from the Universities of Göttingen and Copenhagen now have a better understanding of one of the most ancient stars in the universe. The results of their study were published in the July 21st edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters. The group used high-resolution computer simulations to model the formation of the oldest Read more…

3D Simulations Raise Bar for Astrophysics

Jul 3, 2014 |

For those outside the HPC/science realm who question why there need to be ever-more powerful supercomputers, one need only look at the amazing breakthroughs that the petascale age has facilitated. Astrophysics research out of Caltech is the latest example. Because of leadership-class systems like Stampede and Blue Waters and their experienced support staff, researchers from Read more…

Mega-Simulations Resolve Starburst Puzzle

May 19, 2014 |

Astrophysicists at the CEA (the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) and CNRS (the French National Center for Scientific Research) have achieved a major breakthrough. Thanks to a set of highly precise supercomputer simulations, the scientists have a much keener understanding of the turbulence that is generated when two galaxies collide. The study used Read more…

Simulation Details 13.8 Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution

May 7, 2014 |

Astrophysicists and cosmologists have come up with a new time-lapse simulation of the universe’s evolution that is the most comprehensive and detailed yet. The Illustris simulation, as it’s called, spans 13.8 billion years of cosmic evolution and follows thousands of galaxies taking into account gravity, hydrodynamics, cooling, the course of stellar population and other complex Read more…

Supercomputers Help Capture Rare Black Hole Events

Apr 16, 2014 |

When an orbiting star gets too close to a galaxy’s central supermassive black hole, it eventually gets torn apart by the immense gravitational forces, a phenomenon known as a “tidal disruption.” Although black holes cannot be seen directly, since their dense mass means that not even light can escape, the inhaled star produces a brief Read more…