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Tag: DOE

New Photoresist Could Add Years to Moore’s Law

Jul 17, 2014 |

Over the last five decades, microprocessors have gotten cheaper and more powerful as predicted by Gordon Moore’s famous observation, which states that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every two years. However, the limits of miniaturization can only go so far before crossing the quantum threshold. Currently there is some progress left Read more…

Senate Legislation Prioritizes Science, HPC

Jun 18, 2014 |

The US Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development is proposing legislation that would boost funding for scientific discovery and next-generation computing. The panel, chaired by Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), approved federal funding legislation that would provide $5.086 billion for the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science for the 2015 fiscal year that Read more…

Titan Enables Next-Gen Nuclear Models

Jun 5, 2014 |

One of the main research areas for the Titan supercomputer, the elite Cray system installed at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, is energy, and in particular nuclear energy. At this point, about 20 percent of America’s energy is produced by nuclear power. Many experts say that increasing this percentage is key to meeting our nation’s growing Read more…

‘Edison’ Helps Reinvent the Light Bulb

Apr 9, 2014 |

Today’s consumers have an array of lighting options to select from, giving them the light they want while saving energy and money. In addition to the standard incandescent bulb that’s been around since Thomas Edison invented it about 130 years ago, there are energy-efficient halogen incandescents, compact florescent lamps (CFLs) and a new breed of Read more…

DOE Exascale Roadmap Highlights Big Data

Apr 7, 2014 |

If you’ve been following the US exascale roadmap, then chances are you’ve been following the work of William (“Bill”) J. Harrod, Division Director for the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Office of Science with the US Department of Energy (DOE). In January, Harrod asserted that the DOE’s mission to push the frontiers of science and Read more…

‘Edison’ Lights Up Research at NERSC

Jan 31, 2014 |

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center, located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has taken acceptance of “Edison,” a Cray XC30 supercomputer named in honor of famed American inventor Thomas Alva Edison. The important milestone occurs just as NERSC is commemorating 40 years of scientific advances, prompting NERSC Director Sudip Dosanjh to comment: “As Read more…

Ten Year US Exascale Roadmap Crystalizes

Jan 17, 2014 |

At the tail end of 2013, Congress passed a law directing the Department of Energy to develop exascale computing capability within the next decade in order to meet the objectives of the nuclear stockpile stewardship program. The directive is part of the 2014 National Defense Authorization Act, which President Obama signed into law on December Read more…

DOE Supercomputing Aims for 100-200 PFLOPS in 2017

Jan 16, 2014 |

In a recent post on Atomic City Underground, Frank Munger examines the progress made by the CORAL project, which HPCwire detailed last year. CORAL – which stands for Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne and Livermore – formed so that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Argonne (ANL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) – could combine forces when Read more…

Supercomputing Targets Cleaner Combustion

Oct 1, 2013 |

A team of scientists and mathematicians at the DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are using powerful NERSC supercomputers together with sophisticated algorithms to create cleaner combustion technologies.

Supercomputing Enables Climate Time Machine

Sep 23, 2013 |

Climate scientists use DOE supercomputers to provide independent confirmation of global land warming since 1901 – further evidence of anthropogenic global climate change. Project shows “predictions” not only possible, but also highly accurate…