Tag: Moore’s Law

IEEE Group Seeks to Reinvent Computing as Scaling Stalls

May 6, 2015 |

Computer scientists worried about the end of computing as we know it have been banging heads for several years looking for ways to return to the historical exponential scaling of computer performance. What is needed, say the proponents of an initiative called “Rebooting Computing,” is nothing less than a radical rethinking of how computers are Read more…

Pushing Back the Limits of Microminaturization

Mar 4, 2015 |

Over the last half a century, computers have transformed nearly every facet of society. The information age and its continuing evolution can be traced to the invention of the integrated circuit and the reliable progression of smaller feature sizes – enabling generation after generation of smaller, faster and cheaper microprocessors. But now that foundational trend of modern computing, Read more…

Growing HPC Beyond Moore’s Law

Mar 2, 2015 |

Rice University’s Dr. Jan E. Odegard recently added his voice to a growing chorus of HPC experts weighing in on the changing HPC landscape. As the featured speaker at the first Lunch’n Learn event put on by the Norwegian Consulate General in Houston, Odegard spoke about the inevitable death of Moore’s law and what it will Read more…

Researchers Devise Promising Spintronics Semiconductor

Feb 23, 2015 |

Spintronics — the practice of using electrons to read, write and manipulate data — has long been hailed as a promising avenue for post-CMOS exploration, but imbibing a substrate with the necessary levels of magnetism and conductivity has proved challenging. A cross-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Michigan have created a semiconductor compound Read more…

Horst Simon on the HPC Slowdown

Feb 13, 2015 |

At an HPC meetup event in San Francisco on Feb 10, Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon makes the case that Moore’s law and parallelism can no longer be counted on to provide the exponential growth that has been driving high-performance computing for six decades. If indeed Moore’s law is coming to an end, there Read more…

One Atom Thin Silicon Transistors Are Here

Feb 7, 2015 |

Move over graphene, there’s a new 2D wonder material being hailed as a potential Moore’s law extender, called silicine. This one‐atom‐thick two‐dimensional crystal of silicon could be the ultimate miniaturization enabler, setting the stage for future generations of faster, more energy-efficient microchips. A cousin to graphene, silicine consists of a single layer of atoms arranged Read more…

IBM Advances Self-Assembly in 3D Transistors

Jan 28, 2015 |

The key to Moore’s law is the ability to incorporate ever-smaller feature sizes into each new chip generation. While the exponential progress ensconced in the “law” has slowed down in the last decade, the payoff is still compelling enough that chip engineers will go to great lengths to forestall its long-predicted demise. One of these Read more…

Stanford Group Creates Four-Layer Stacked Chip

Dec 18, 2014 |

With transistor scaling slated to come up against some fundamental limits over the next five to seven years, chip designers are hot on the trail of technologies to extend the exponential advances described by Moore’s law. One of the most promising areas of R&D involves stacking layers of logic and memory into 3D chips. The implementation Read more…

Will Magnets Be the Cure for What Ails Moore’s Law?

Oct 1, 2014 |

With silicon-based processors facing some inexorable limits, scientists are looking elsewhere to keep computing on its exponential growth track. One potential alternative that is getting some traction is magnet-based computing. A group of electrical engineers at the Technische Universität München (TUM) is studying the feasibility of using miniature magnets as the building block for integrated Read more…

Quick Change Material Begs Post-Silicon Consideration

Sep 22, 2014 |

With Moore’s law in peril, the search is on for the next computing substrate. Keeping up the pace of progress in an ever more compute and data driven world will likely require a post-silicon invention that can satisfy humanity’s need for faster, smaller, greener and more powerful computers. In recognition of the size and speed Read more…