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Tag: transistors

Startup Aims to Transform Computing with Probability Processing

Aug 16, 2010 |

MIT spin-out Lyric Semiconductor Inc. has launched a new breed of integrated circuits that replaces the binary logic of traditional computing with probabilistic logic. The aim is to deliver a much more efficient architecture for applications based on probability computing. For these types of workloads, the company is promising orders-of-magnitude improvement in energy efficiency, performance and cost.

Intel Prototypes Low-Power Circuits

Mar 23, 2010 |

Chips that let errors happen, then correct them, prove more efficient.

The Week in Review

Feb 25, 2010 |

A safer nuclear reactor could be on the horizon thanks to computer modeling; and the National Science Foundation awards $24.5 million to UC Berkeley researchers engaged in reducing the power draw of electronics. We recap those stories and more in our weekly wrapup.

Junctionless Transistor Could Simplify Chip Making, Say Researchers

Feb 23, 2010 |

Irish researchers claim semiconductor breakthrough.

Graphene Transistors That Work at Blistering Speeds

Feb 5, 2010 |

IBM has created graphene transistors that leave silicon ones in the dust.

The Week in Review

Nov 12, 2009 |

Ohio Supercomputer Center and Nimbis Services partner to provide e-commerce service; and Purdue announces fin-shaped transistor that could lead to smaller, faster computer processors. We recap those stories and more in our weekly wrapup.

After the Transistor, a Leap Into the Microcosm

Sep 1, 2009 |

Is the era of silicon-based electronics coming to an end?

The Road to Energy Efficient Electronics

Jun 15, 2009 |

Berkeley symposium calls for changes from circuits to networks.

Graphene Transistors Promise Life After Silicon

Mar 2, 2007 |

Researchers at the University of Manchester have used the world’s thinnest material to create the world’s smallest transistor — a breakthrough that could spark the development of a new type of super-fast computer chip. They believe this innovation will allow the rapid miniaturization of electronics to continue when the current silicon-based technology runs out of steam.