The Week in Review

By Tiffany Trader

May 13, 2010

Here is a collection of highlights from this week’s news stream as reported by HPCwire.

IBM Opens Development Laboratory in Manchester, England

SGI Announces Expansion of Storage Product Line

NVIDIA Chief Scientist Bill Dally Receives Computer Architecture’s Highest Honor

OSC Serves New Research Groups with Launch of ‘Csuri’ Advanced GPU Environment

Bright Cluster Manager Now Available on the Cray CX1 and Cray CX1000 Systems

Quantum Mechanics Reveals New Details of Deep Earth

CERN Supercollider Begins Sending Data to OSC, Other Sites

Accurate Cloud Modeling Key to New Global Climate Models

XtremeData Partners with Cray to Deliver Deskside Analytic Data Warehousing Appliance

CLC bio Japan Provides Sequence Analysis Infrastructure to RIKEN Omics Science Center

First PRACE Petaflops System Ready for European Researchers

IBM, NTU Announce HPC-Cloud Collaboration

Scientists Seeking NSF Funding Will Soon Be Required to Submit Data Management Plans

Bull’s Board of Directors Appoints Philippe Vannier as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Look out silicon chips, here comes … DNA?

How cool is this? Computer chips made out of synthesized strands of DNA. Chris Dwyer, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering, has been working on just such a technology.

In recent experiments, Dwyer demonstrated that by mixing customized snippets of DNA and other molecules, he could create billions of identical, tiny structures that look like miniature waffles. These nanostructures can be used as the building blocks for applications ranging from the biomedical to the computational. In fact, the self-assembly of molecular nanostructures is expected to one day form the basis of future high-speed integrated circuits.

The nanostructures function as optical logic circuits, which use light instead of electricity to signal a “yes or no”, “zero or one” type of binary response. This light-based DNA switching occurs more rapidly than with a traditional circuit that uses an electrical current.

Dwyer believes that these self-assembled, light-sensing molecular circuits can be produced inexpensively in virtually limitless quantities. In fact, in one day, one scientist in a lab can produce more of these simple logic circuits than the world’s entire output of silicon chips in a month. More complex circuits can be created using various combinations of DNA strands.

Says Dwyer:

This is the first demonstration of such an active and rapid processing and sensing capacity at the molecular level. Conventional technology has reached its physical limits. The ability to cheaply produce virtually unlimited supplies of these tiny circuits seems to me to be the next logical step.

The results of Dwyer’s experiments were published online in the journal Small.

In HPC compiler news…

There are a couple of compiler announcements this week. First up, Impulse Accelerated Technologies and DRC Computer have announced that the Impulse C-to-FPGA tools have been integrated with the DRC Accelium, Xilinx-based coprocessor card. This will allow software developers to access FPGA-based hardware acceleration using familiar C programming tools. The integration work was performed by Synective Labs, a long-time partner of both DRC and Impulse.

According to the announcement, many design teams are finding that their investment in software development is outpacing their investment in hardware development, so there is an increasing need for programming tools that enable the quick deployment of future platforms as they emerge. The enhanced tools are said to support such a migration to future FPGA-based accelerators since most if not all of the design code is abstracted from hardware, allowing the design and test code to be easily retargeted to future platforms.

And from the Portland Group: PGI compilers are now available across the entire Cray product line. PGI compilers are already installed on nearly all Cray XT systems, but now Cray will resell PGI compilers and development tools with the Cray CX1 and CX1000 systems. The optimizing Fortran, C, and C++ compilers and development tools support the latest 64-bit processors from AMD and Intel and include the new PGI Accelerator features for NVIDIA GPUs, allowing them to leverage the GPU capabilities of the Cray CX line.

Douglas Miles, director of the Portland Group, said:

Giving Cray’s customers the flexibility and simplicity of purchasing our high-performance compilers directly from Cray for the Cray CX1 and Cray CX1000 systems is a big win for everyone. Together we can offer a uniform PGI compiler environment on the Cray CX machines running Linux or Windows up through the high-end scalable Cray XT machines and provide significant ease of migration and application upscaling benefits for existing and future Cray users.

PGI compilers and tools are used by developers to create high-performance computing applications in such fields as weather forecasting, geophysical processing, aerodynamic simulation, structural analysis, automotive crash-testing, and computational chemistry.

Subscribe to HPCwire's Weekly Update!

Be the most informed person in the room! Stay ahead of the tech trends with industy updates delivered to you every week!

NREL ‘Eagle’ Supercomputer to Advance Energy Tech R&D

August 14, 2018

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has contracted with HPE for a new 8-petaflops (peak) supercomputer that will be used to advance early-stage R&D on energy technologies s Read more…

By Tiffany Trader

Training Time Slashed for Deep Learning

August 14, 2018

Fast.ai, an organization offering free courses on deep learning, claimed a new speed record for training a popular image database using Nvidia GPUs running on public cloud infrastructure. A pair of researchers trained Read more…

By George Leopold

CERN Project Sees Orders-of-Magnitude Speedup with AI Approach

August 14, 2018

An award-winning effort at CERN has demonstrated potential to significantly change how the physics based modeling and simulation communities view machine learning. The CERN team demonstrated that AI-based models have the Read more…

By Rob Farber

HPE Extreme Performance Solutions

Introducing the First Integrated System Management Software for HPC Clusters from HPE

How do you manage your complex, growing cluster environments? Answer that big challenge with the new HPC cluster management solution: HPE Performance Cluster Manager. Read more…

IBM Accelerated Insights

Super Problem Solving

You might think that tackling the world’s toughest problems is a job only for superheroes, but at special places such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, supercomputers are the real heroes. Read more…

Rigetti Eyes Scaling with 128-Qubit Architecture

August 10, 2018

Rigetti Computing plans to build a 128-qubit quantum computer based on an equivalent quantum processor that leverages emerging hybrid computing algorithms used to test programs and potential applications. Founded in 2 Read more…

By George Leopold

NREL ‘Eagle’ Supercomputer to Advance Energy Tech R&D

August 14, 2018

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has contracted with HPE for a new 8-petaflops (peak) supercomputer that will be Read more…

By Tiffany Trader

CERN Project Sees Orders-of-Magnitude Speedup with AI Approach

August 14, 2018

An award-winning effort at CERN has demonstrated potential to significantly change how the physics based modeling and simulation communities view machine learni Read more…

By Rob Farber

Intel Announces Cooper Lake, Advances AI Strategy

August 9, 2018

Intel's chief datacenter exec Navin Shenoy kicked off the company's Data-Centric Innovation Summit Wednesday, the day-long program devoted to Intel's datacenter Read more…

By Tiffany Trader

SLATE Update: Making Math Libraries Exascale-ready

August 9, 2018

Practically-speaking, achieving exascale computing requires enabling HPC software to effectively use accelerators – mostly GPUs at present – and that remain Read more…

By John Russell

Summertime in Washington: Some Unexpected Advanced Computing News

August 8, 2018

Summertime in Washington DC is known for its heat and humidity. That is why most people get away to either the mountains or the seashore and things slow down. H Read more…

By Alex R. Larzelere

NSF Invests $15 Million in Quantum STAQ

August 7, 2018

Quantum computing development is in full ascent as global backers aim to transcend the limitations of classical computing by leveraging the magical-seeming prop Read more…

By Tiffany Trader

By the Numbers: Cray Would Like Exascale to Be the Icing on the Cake

August 1, 2018

On its earnings call held for investors yesterday, Cray gave an accounting for its latest quarterly financials, offered future guidance and provided an update o Read more…

By Tiffany Trader

Google is First Partner in NIH’s STRIDES Effort to Speed Discovery in the Cloud

July 31, 2018

The National Institutes of Health, with the help of Google, last week launched STRIDES - Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimen Read more…

By John Russell

Leading Solution Providers

SC17 Booth Video Tours Playlist

Altair @ SC17

Altair

AMD @ SC17

AMD

ASRock Rack @ SC17

ASRock Rack

CEJN @ SC17

CEJN

DDN Storage @ SC17

DDN Storage

Huawei @ SC17

Huawei

IBM @ SC17

IBM

IBM Power Systems @ SC17

IBM Power Systems

Intel @ SC17

Intel

Lenovo @ SC17

Lenovo

Mellanox Technologies @ SC17

Mellanox Technologies

Microsoft @ SC17

Microsoft

Penguin Computing @ SC17

Penguin Computing

Pure Storage @ SC17

Pure Storage

Supericro @ SC17

Supericro

Tyan @ SC17

Tyan

Univa @ SC17

Univa

  • arrow
  • Click Here for More Headlines
  • arrow
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
Share This