Features

PNNL’s CENATE Quickly Winning Industry Support and Collaboration

Jul 6, 2016 | Getting to the root of how things work has informed and progressed all aspects of scientific discovery. As computers and applications grow in complexity, seemingly poised to enter a new phase beyond the limits of Moore’s Law and CMOS technology, enlightening how they work best is paramount. With new resources from a growing list of industry partners, the Center for Advanced Technology Evaluation – known as CENATE – a computing proving ground at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, is rapidly expanding its capabilities to assist the high-performance computing community. Read more…

Trinity Wrestles with Knights Landing Programming Challenge with COE

Jul 5, 2016 | Seventy-one years ago, on July 16, 1945, an incredible explosion lit up the New Mexico night sky. This was the Trinity Test, the world’s first nuclear detonation, and it marked the beginning of the Nuclear Age. It also ushered in the age of supercomputers, which essentially began with weapons science at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Now a new Trinity, a next generation Cray XC supercomputer is about to take center stage to help the national security labs achieve their primary mission – to provide the nation with a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent. Read more…

Genomic Sequencing at Children’s Mercy: Saving Time to Save Lives

Jul 1, 2016 | Genomic sequencing – that is, rapid sequencing – is instrumental to diagnosing and treating critically ill patients, and managing the high data volumes involved in genomics is essential to the process. Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, MO, (354 beds, not-for-profit, treating children from birth through the age of 21) operates what it says is the world’s first whole genome sequencing center in a pediatric setting, where physicians, clinical laboratory scientists, molecular geneticists, bioinformaticians and software engineers work to sequence and analyze rare inherited diseases. Read more…

Compilers and More: OpenACC to OpenMP (and back again)

Jun 29, 2016 | In the last year or so, I’ve had several academic researchers ask me whether I thought it was a good idea for them to develop a tool to automatically convert OpenACC programs to OpenMP 4 and vice versa. In each case, the motivation was that some systems had OpenMP 4 compilers (x86 plus Intel Xeon Phi Knights Corner) and others had OpenACC (x86 plus NVIDIA GPU or AMD GPU), and someone wanting to run a program across both would need two slightly different programs. In each case, the proposed research sounded like a more-or-less mechanical translation process, something more like a sophisticated awk script, and that’s doomed from the start. I will explain below in more detail how I came to this conclusion. Read more…

XSEDE16 Program Emphasizes Inclusion, Says Chair Kelly Gaither

Jun 29, 2016 | Ahead of XSEDE16, which takes place in Miami from July 17-21, HPCwire reached out to conference chair Dr. Kelly Gaither to get the inside track on this year's program, her work in scientific visualization and her commitment to increasing diversity in HPC. Gaither serves as the director of Visualization at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin. She has over 30 refereed publications in fields ranging from computational mechanics to supercomputing applications to scientific visualization. Over the past ten years, she has actively participated in conferences related to her field and has given numerous invited talks. Read more…

Profile of a Data Science Pioneer

Jun 28, 2016 | As he approaches retirement, Reagan Moore reflects on SRB, iRODS, and the ongoing challenge of helping scientists manage their data. In 1994, Reagan Moore managed the production computing systems at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), a job that entailed running and maintaining huge Cray computing systems as well as networking, archival storage, security, job scheduling, and visualization systems. At the time, research was evolving from analyses done by individuals on single computers into a collaborative activity using distributed, interconnected and heterogeneous resources. Read more…

Thomas Sterling’s ISC 2016 Closing Keynote

Jun 23, 2016 | Capturing the sparkle, wit, and selective skewering in Thomas Sterling’s annual closing ISC keynote is challenging. This year was his 13th, which perhaps conveys the engaging manner and substantive content he delivers. Like many in the room, Sterling is an HPC pioneer as well as the director of CREST, the Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technologies, Indiana University. In his ISC talk, Sterling holds up a mirror to the HPC world, shares what he sees, and invites all to look in as well and see what they may. Read more…

South Africa Team Claims Third ISC Student Cluster Championship

Jun 23, 2016 | At an awards ceremony held yesterday at ISC 2016 in Frankfurt, Germany, a roar of applause filled the auditorium as Team South Africa took to the stage to collect their third HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition championship prize from HPC luminary Thomas Sterling. "I have to say that this is extraordinary," said Sterling, who was helping to officiate along with Gilad Shainer (of Mellanox). Read more…

Around the HPC World in 81 Slides with IDC

Jun 21, 2016 | IDC presented its annual HPC Update at ISC yesterday. As usual it was a whirlwind tour encompassing HPC market data, technology trends, new IDC initiatives, announcement of the ISC16 Innovation Award recipients, and an update on IDC's DOE-funded study to demonstrate HPC’s ROI. Read more…

Intel Launches ‘Knights Landing’ Phi Family for HPC, Machine Learning

Jun 21, 2016 | From ISC 2016 in Frankfurt, Germany, this week, Intel Corp. announced that its new Xeon Phi product family, formerly code-named Knights Landing, is now shipping for high-performance computing and machine learning workloads. The company had been shipping to early customers for the last six months and was waiting to ramp up production before making the product generally available. The window also gave OEMs time to complete their readiness, said Intel's Charlie Wuischpard. Read more…