Since 1987 - Covering the Fastest Computers in the World and the People Who Run Them


Researchers Shrink Transistor Gate to One Nanometer

Oct 13, 2016 |

A team of US scientists may have just breathed new life into a faltering Moore’s law and advanced the limits of microelectronic miniaturization with the fabrication of a transistor with a 1nm gate. The breakthrough portends a path beyond silicon-based transistors, which have been widely predicted to hit a wall at 5-nanometers.

Intel’s Fryman: “It’s not that we love CMOS; it’s the only real choice.”

Sep 1, 2016 |

Forget for a moment the prevailing high anxiety over Moore’s Law’s fate. In the near-term – which could easily mean a decade – CMOS will remain the only viable, volume technology driving computing. Pursue alternatives? Of course, urged Josh Fryman, principal engineer and engineering manager, Intel.

IBM First to 7nm Process with Working Transistors

Jul 9, 2015 |

IBM Research has announced the world’s first 7nm node test chips with functioning transistors, accomplished via a partnership with GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung at SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (SUNY Poly CNSE). Although production 7nm chips are at least two years away, IBM has delivered on its promise to develop the process nodes and beaten Read more…

Pushing Back the Limits of Microminaturization

Mar 4, 2015 |

Over the last half a century, computers have transformed nearly every facet of society. The information age and its continuing evolution can be traced to the invention of the integrated circuit and the reliable progression of smaller feature sizes – enabling generation after generation of smaller, faster and cheaper microprocessors. But now that foundational trend of modern computing, Read more…

One Atom Thin Silicon Transistors Are Here

Feb 7, 2015 |

Move over graphene, there’s a new 2D wonder material being hailed as a potential Moore’s law extender, called silicine. This one‐atom‐thick two‐dimensional crystal of silicon could be the ultimate miniaturization enabler, setting the stage for future generations of faster, more energy-efficient microchips. A cousin to graphene, silicine consists of a single layer of atoms arranged Read more…

Deconstructing Moore’s Law’s Limits

Aug 18, 2014 |

For the past five decades, computers have progressed on a predictable trajectory, doubling in speed roughly every two years in tune with Gordon Moore’s oft-cited observation-turned-prophecy. Although semiconductor scaling continues to yield performance gains, many perceive a tipping point is nigh, where the cost-benefit analysis of further miniaturization breaks down. The latest researcher to weigh Read more…

Planning for Post Moore’s Law

May 28, 2014 |

In this video from Hot Chips 25, Dr. Robert Colwell of DARPA delivers an insightful overview on the “looming issue” that is the death of Moore’s law. Colwell starts out with the humorous point that “physics doesn’t care what we believe.” Believing that Moore’s law – Gordon Moore’s 1965 observation that a chip’s transistor count doubles Read more…

Moore’s Law in a Post-Silicon Era

Jan 10, 2014 |

When it comes to ushering in the next-generation of computer chips, Moore’s Law is not dead, it is just evolving, so say some of the more optimistic scientists and engineers cited in a recent New York Times article from science writer John Markoff. Despite numerous proclamations foretelling Moore’s Law’s imminent demise, there are those who Read more…

Breakthrough for Photonic-Electronic Microchips

Oct 8, 2013 |

Silicon photonics is in the spotlight again, being pitched by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Micron Technology Inc. as a potential Moore’s Law extender. The technology of silicon photonics refers to using light, instead of electrical wires, to enable silicon-based transistors to communicate on a single chip. Read more…

Stanford Debuts First Carbon Nanotube Computer

Sep 27, 2013 |

A new computer made of carbon nanotubes, created by a team of Stanford engineers, may be the first serious silicon challenger.