Tag: silicon

Report Addresses the Perils of Dark Silicon

Jul 21, 2016 |

Dark silicon refers to the processing potential that’s lost when thermal constraints disallow full CPU utilization. The gap between transistor scaling and voltage scaling combined with tighter integration of components (multicore, SoCs) has power density ramifications that are of particular concern for embedded computing, but high-performance computing faces similar “dark power” challenges. Bringing attention to this issue and exploring common solutions was the goal of the Dagstuhl Seminar 16052, “Dark Silicon: From Embedded to HPC Systems.”

LBNL Researchers Report Method to Make “Atomically Thin” Circuits

Jul 14, 2016 |

This week researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have reported a new method to create transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick. Their report, Large-scale chemical assembly of atomically thin transistors and circuits, published in Nature Nanotechnology, is another reminder that novel materials and approaches may indeed contribute to extending Moore’s law. Read more…

RISC-V Startup Aims to Democratize Custom Silicon

Jul 13, 2016 |

Momentum for open source hardware made a significant advance this week with the launch of startup SiFive and its open source chip platforms based on the RISC-V instruction set architecture. The founders of the fabless semiconductor company — Krste Asanovic, Andrew Waterman, and Yunsup Lee — invented the free and open RISC-V ISA at the University of California, Berkeley, six years ago. The progression of RISC-V and the launch of SiFive opens the door to a new way of chip building that skirts prohibitive licensing costs and lowers the barrier to entry…

Mellanox Touts Arrival of Intelligent Interconnect

Nov 16, 2015 |

Intelligence and integration are the watchwords of an era in which the insatiable demand for faster, more powerful computers can no longer ride the coattails of a strong Moore’s law. These are also the hallmarks of co-design, an approach that is championed by interconnect fabric vendor Mellanox Technologies and others in the community as essential for supercomputing Read more…

Graphene Promises Ultimate On-Chip Interconnect Scaling

Jun 29, 2015 |

Graphene has been heralded as a potential Moore’s law extender. The single-atom layer of carbon is prized for its strength, flexibility, lightness and conductivity. While most graphene electronics research has centered on its potential as a silicon replacement, a research project out of Stanford University has a different proposition, one that may, in fact, be a more feasible first-production-use of graphene. In Read more…

One Atom Thin Silicon Transistors Are Here

Feb 7, 2015 |

Move over graphene, there’s a new 2D wonder material being hailed as a potential Moore’s law extender, called silicine. This one‐atom‐thick two‐dimensional crystal of silicon could be the ultimate miniaturization enabler, setting the stage for future generations of faster, more energy-efficient microchips. A cousin to graphene, silicine consists of a single layer of atoms arranged Read more…

Unmasking the Speed Limit of Modern Electronics

Dec 11, 2014 |

For the first time, scientists have captured the essence of semiconductor computing on film by taking snapshots of the electron transfer from valence to conduction band states. It is this leap that forms the basis for the entire semiconductor industry, digital electronics and modern computing as we know it. Using attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy Read more…

IBM Bets on Nanotubes to Succeed Silicon in 2020

Jul 2, 2014 |

The effect of five decades of exponential progress with silicon chips doubling in speed every couple years as observed by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore in 1965 cannot be overstated. As silicon-based transistors push against the limits of physics, the death of Moore’s law could pack a devastating blow to the industry and even the global Read more…

Moore’s Law in a Post-Silicon Era

Jan 10, 2014 |

When it comes to ushering in the next-generation of computer chips, Moore’s Law is not dead, it is just evolving, so say some of the more optimistic scientists and engineers cited in a recent New York Times article from science writer John Markoff. Despite numerous proclamations foretelling Moore’s Law’s imminent demise, there are those who Read more…

Stanford Debuts First Carbon Nanotube Computer

Sep 27, 2013 |

A new computer made of carbon nanotubes, created by a team of Stanford engineers, may be the first serious silicon challenger.