Five Trends Shaping HPC in 2023

By Philip C. Roth

March 6, 2023

Today’s HPC landscape is one of rapid growth, change, and evolution. The overall market has skyrocketed to $34.8 billion with expected developments fueling continued expansion. From pandemic aftereffects and growing cross-disciplinary work to increasing technical advancements, we have entered into a new paradigm for HPC. In fact, the IEEE Computer Society (CS) recently predicted that, “New software for the development and deployment of next-generation computing components, systems, and platforms [will] enable a transition to a compute continuum with strong capacities at the edge and far edge in an energy efficient and trustworthy manner,” among other technology advancements.

But what does this mean for HPC in 2023? In short, these shifts have given way to five key trends that will spark increased research, development, and commercialization of critical technologies:

1. Exascale computing. We are firmly rooted in the exascale period. In fact, Hyperion Research predicts the value of accepted exascale systems around the globe will reach $10 billion by 2027.

“We’re on the cusp of now benefiting from the impact of science using that amount of processing in multiple different places,” noted my colleague Bill Kramer, Blue Waters Director at the University of Illinois, National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and SC22 conference vice chair. “We will be seeing a significant improvement coming from greatly increased fidelity (e.g. increased grid resolution, increased numbers of particles, more complex agent behaviors), and/or expanded time steps, because there is more computing power being brought to bear on these problems and much more complex algorithms and data flows.”

2. HPC with AI and ML. For some time now, the community has been pushing boundaries by incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) into HPC models. We are seeing these integrations as more commonplace in certain environments, and that has given way to new opportunities for technical exploration.

“We are seeing technology advances in hardware. You have tech companies building more capable GPUs as well as companies that have built special-purpose AI computing hardware, and we’re finding new ways to use it,” shared Jamie Van Randwyk, manager and computer scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SC23 finance chair. “As technology advances, people develop new software and have embraced analytics, and now the hardware technology and the software are more effectively integrated and can run in a reasonable amount of time. It brings a lot of potential.”

3. Quantum computing. This one has been a long time coming, but we’re starting to realize true developments as quantum computing makes its way from theoretical concept to HPC application. We’re very much at the beginning of the quantum era.

Looking forward over the next five years, I’m expecting a lot of work around how we take quantum devices and incorporate them into more traditional computing environments; write programs that have a traditional piece, but then call out to the quantum resources as a sort of accelerator; and then make use of the information in the traditional science workflows.

4. Portable performance and productivity. There’s an increased emphasis on these areas for efficiency and scalability. If I develop science software for one machine, I want to be able to take that same implementation to another machine and get good performance and accuracy out of it without having to do a whole lot of work in porting it over.

As we consider adding more non-traditional computing devices like neuromorphic processors and quantum components to systems, performance portability is going to be a big aspect. You want the application developer, who may not be a programmer by trade but rather a physicist or chemist, to focus on their science and still be able to run their software on whatever systems are available to them with good performance and scientifically equivalent results.

5. Cross-disciplinary collaboration. With portable performance and productivity as a focus, it makes sense that cross-disciplinary collaboration continues to climb. The Covid pandemic simply accelerated a trend that had been percolating for quite some time. As Gina Tourassi, director of the National Center for Computational Sciences at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, summed up at SC22, taking this focused, cooperative approach has yielded results far beyond their initial intended outcomes. She pointed to the work between the Department of Energy and the Leadership Computing Facilities and its strategic partnership with the National Cancer Institute:

“The unintended consequence of these partnerships is that the models we have been developing and deploying, the AI models that are completely tailored to cancer clinical data, found immediate translation during the pandemic in terms of leveraging these AI models with completely different data sets, in terms of accelerating the search process of finding promising therapeutic targets,” Tourassi remarked. “So, these are some of the exciting things of partnerships, and collaborations, and cross-pollination of ideas; we often start with something in mind, and it can be so much more.”

2023 promises to bring further advances in HPC, with research democratizing exascale technologies; enabling quantum explorations; introducing AI and ML algorithms for new forms of analytics; investigating portable performance and productivity; and emphasizing cross-discipline collaborations. And industry partners will continue supporting HPC by developing solutions that enable the evolution of ideas and their application to new environments.

Yet these developments only scratch the surface of HPC’s true potential in 2023. I know I speak for all of us when I say it’s an exciting time to be in computer science and engineering. As the year goes on, I have no doubt we will see many milestones achieved, and I am looking forward to our community driving those shifts and being awed by the opportunities that we will face in 2023.

Philip C. Roth is deputy chair of SC23 and group leader in the National Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For more information on HPC in 2023, contact IEEE CS or visit computer.org.

 

Subscribe to HPCwire's Weekly Update!

Be the most informed person in the room! Stay ahead of the tech trends with industry updates delivered to you every week!

A Big Memory Nvidia GH200 Next to Your Desk: Closer Than You Think

February 22, 2024

Students of the microprocessor may recall that the original 8086/8088 processors did not have floating point units. The motherboard often had an extra socket for an optional 8087 math coprocessor. The math coprocessor ma Read more…

IonQ Reports Advance on Path to Networked Quantum Computing

February 22, 2024

IonQ reported reaching a milestone in its efforts to use entangled photon-ion connectivity to scale its quantum computers. IonQ’s quantum computers are based on trapped ions which feature long coherence times and qubit Read more…

Apple Rolls out Post Quantum Security for iOS

February 21, 2024

Think implementing so-called Post Quantum Cryptography (PQC) isn't important because quantum computers able to decrypt current RSA codes don’t yet exist? Not Apple. Today the consumer electronics giant started rolling Read more…

GenAI Having Major Impact on Data Culture, Survey Says

February 21, 2024

While 2023 was the year of GenAI, the adoption rates for GenAI did not match expectations. Most organizations are continuing to invest in GenAI but are yet to derive any substantial value from it. However, the GenAI hyp Read more…

QED-C Issues New Quantum Benchmarking Paper

February 20, 2024

The Quantum Economic Development Consortium last week released a new paper on benchmarking – Quantum Algorithm Exploration using Application-Oriented Performance Benchmarks – that builds on earlier work and is an eff Read more…

AWS Solution Channel

Shutterstock 2283618597

Deep-dive into Ansys Fluent performance on Ansys Gateway powered by AWS

Today, we’re going to deep-dive into the performance and associated cost of running computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations on AWS using Ansys Fluent through the Ansys Gateway powered by AWS (or just “Ansys Gateway” for the rest of this post). Read more…

Atom Computing Reports Advance in Scaling Up Neutral Atom Qubit Arrays

February 15, 2024

The scale-up challenge facing quantum computing (QC) is daunting and varied. It’s commonly held that 1 million qubits (or more) will be needed to deliver practical fault tolerant QC. It’s also a varied challenge beca Read more…

A Big Memory Nvidia GH200 Next to Your Desk: Closer Than You Think

February 22, 2024

Students of the microprocessor may recall that the original 8086/8088 processors did not have floating point units. The motherboard often had an extra socket fo Read more…

Apple Rolls out Post Quantum Security for iOS

February 21, 2024

Think implementing so-called Post Quantum Cryptography (PQC) isn't important because quantum computers able to decrypt current RSA codes don’t yet exist? Not Read more…

QED-C Issues New Quantum Benchmarking Paper

February 20, 2024

The Quantum Economic Development Consortium last week released a new paper on benchmarking – Quantum Algorithm Exploration using Application-Oriented Performa Read more…

The Pulse of HPC: Tracking 4.5 Million Heartbeats of 3D Coronary Flow

February 15, 2024

Working in Duke University's Randles Lab, Cyrus Tanade, a National Science Foundation graduate student fellow and Ph.D. candidate in biomedical engineering, is Read more…

It Doesn’t Get Much SWEETER: The Winter HPC Computing Festival in Corpus Christi

February 14, 2024

(Main Photo by Visit Corpus Christi CrowdRiff) Texas A&M University's High-Performance Research Computing (HPRC) team hosted the "SWEETER Winter Comput Read more…

Q-Roundup: Diraq’s War Chest, DARPA’s Bet on Topological Qubits, Citi/Classiq Explore Optimization, WEF’s Quantum Blueprint

February 13, 2024

Yesterday, Australian start-up Diraq added $15 million to its war chest (now $120 million) to build a fault tolerant computer based on quantum dots. Last week D Read more…

2024 Winter Classic: Razor Thin Margins in HPL/HPCG

February 12, 2024

The first task for the 11 teams in the 2024 Winter Classic student cluster competition was to run and optimize the LINPACK and HPCG benchmarks. As usual, the Read more…

2024 Winter Classic: We’re Back!

February 9, 2024

The fourth edition of the Winter Classic Invitational Student Cluster Competition is up and running. This year, we have 11 teams of eager students representin Read more…

CORNELL I-WAY DEMONSTRATION PITS PARASITE AGAINST VICTIM

October 6, 1995

Ithaca, NY --Visitors to this year's Supercomputing '95 (SC'95) conference will witness a life-and-death struggle between parasite and victim, using virtual Read more…

SGI POWERS VIRTUAL OPERATING ROOM USED IN SURGEON TRAINING

October 6, 1995

Surgery simulations to date have largely been created through the development of dedicated applications requiring considerable programming and computer graphi Read more…

U.S. Will Relax Export Restrictions on Supercomputers

October 6, 1995

New York, NY -- U.S. President Bill Clinton has announced that he will definitely relax restrictions on exports of high-performance computers, giving a boost Read more…

Dutch HPC Center Will Have 20 GFlop, 76-Node SP2 Online by 1996

October 6, 1995

Amsterdam, the Netherlands -- SARA, (Stichting Academisch Rekencentrum Amsterdam), Academic Computing Services of Amsterdam recently announced that it has pur Read more…

Cray Delivers J916 Compact Supercomputer to Solvay Chemical

October 6, 1995

Eagan, Minn. -- Cray Research Inc. has delivered a Cray J916 low-cost compact supercomputer and Cray's UniChem client/server computational chemistry software Read more…

NEC Laboratory Reviews First Year of Cooperative Projects

October 6, 1995

Sankt Augustin, Germany -- NEC C&C (Computers and Communication) Research Laboratory at the GMD Technopark has wrapped up its first year of operation. Read more…

Sun and Sybase Say SQL Server 11 Benchmarks at 4544.60 tpmC

October 6, 1995

Mountain View, Calif. -- Sun Microsystems, Inc. and Sybase, Inc. recently announced the first benchmark results for SQL Server 11. The result represents a n Read more…

New Study Says Parallel Processing Market Will Reach $14B in 1999

October 6, 1995

Mountain View, Calif. -- A study by the Palo Alto Management Group (PAMG) indicates the market for parallel processing systems will increase at more than 4 Read more…

Leading Solution Providers

Contributors

CORNELL I-WAY DEMONSTRATION PITS PARASITE AGAINST VICTIM

October 6, 1995

Ithaca, NY --Visitors to this year's Supercomputing '95 (SC'95) conference will witness a life-and-death struggle between parasite and victim, using virtual Read more…

SGI POWERS VIRTUAL OPERATING ROOM USED IN SURGEON TRAINING

October 6, 1995

Surgery simulations to date have largely been created through the development of dedicated applications requiring considerable programming and computer graphi Read more…

U.S. Will Relax Export Restrictions on Supercomputers

October 6, 1995

New York, NY -- U.S. President Bill Clinton has announced that he will definitely relax restrictions on exports of high-performance computers, giving a boost Read more…

Dutch HPC Center Will Have 20 GFlop, 76-Node SP2 Online by 1996

October 6, 1995

Amsterdam, the Netherlands -- SARA, (Stichting Academisch Rekencentrum Amsterdam), Academic Computing Services of Amsterdam recently announced that it has pur Read more…

Cray Delivers J916 Compact Supercomputer to Solvay Chemical

October 6, 1995

Eagan, Minn. -- Cray Research Inc. has delivered a Cray J916 low-cost compact supercomputer and Cray's UniChem client/server computational chemistry software Read more…

NEC Laboratory Reviews First Year of Cooperative Projects

October 6, 1995

Sankt Augustin, Germany -- NEC C&C (Computers and Communication) Research Laboratory at the GMD Technopark has wrapped up its first year of operation. Read more…

Sun and Sybase Say SQL Server 11 Benchmarks at 4544.60 tpmC

October 6, 1995

Mountain View, Calif. -- Sun Microsystems, Inc. and Sybase, Inc. recently announced the first benchmark results for SQL Server 11. The result represents a n Read more…

New Study Says Parallel Processing Market Will Reach $14B in 1999

October 6, 1995

Mountain View, Calif. -- A study by the Palo Alto Management Group (PAMG) indicates the market for parallel processing systems will increase at more than 4 Read more…

  • arrow
  • Click Here for More Headlines
  • arrow
HPCwire